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Meet ‘Chintu’ – An IBM Watson-Powered Robot by MIT Pune

A savvy bundle of understudies from Maharashtra Foundation of Innovation (MIT), Pune have created ‘Chintu’ — A Robot Buddy fueled by IBM Watson Innovation.

Chintu, the subjective colleague robot is intended to help the senior residents in leading ordinary errands, for example, perusing the daily paper/book, give disposition based excitement administrations to tune and move and produce updates on their day by day drug.

Chintu is two feet (58-cm) tall and around five kilos in weight, made of a cluster of sensors and cameras.

While the robot originated from French firm, Aldebaran Mechanical technology (now SoftBank Apply autonomy), the understudies utilized APIs of IBM Watson, alongside the IBM Bluemix Cloud stage to make the ‘brains’ or the real knowledge behind the robot.

Remarkably, MIT Pune had gotten a concede of Rs 10 lakh a year ago from IBM to built up the robot under psychological colleague, IBM Watson.

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Chintu can move his hands and read books to a group of people. “Drawing from Watson’s area information, Chintu will help senior nationals in directing ordinary errands, for example, perusing the daily paper/book and create updates on their day by day pharmaceutical,” Educator and Head of PC Building Office at MIT Pune, Vrushali Kulkarni, told PTI

 

Students of MIT, Pune working on Project Chintu — (L-R) Krishnamohan Manmohan, Astitva Shah, Sanketh Gupta Chellu, Rishav Dasgupta and Professor Vrushali Kulkarni

Understudies at MIT have been taking a shot at Task Chintu for as far back as couple of months. While ‘Chintu’ is as yet a couple of years from getting to be standard, the understudies will keep on working on him to include functionalities. “This has likewise opened up another and energizing examination road for our understudies. Mechanical autonomy, Machine Learning and Psychological Figuring are intriguing fields of research today and our understudies are getting direct understanding of working in these fields,” included Kulkarni.

Mezjan Dallas, University Relations Leader at IBM India said the project is a great example of co-creation. “You put great technology in the hands of bright and enthusiastic students, you give them freedom and a fun element and India’s next generation of engineers start to do magical things,” he said.

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